About Emily Pohl-Weary

Emily Pohl-Weary's most recent novel is Strange Times at Western High (Annick Press), a young adult mystery featuring misfit Natalie Fuentes, who solves a crime in her high school. Like the character Natalie, Pohl-Weary’s first publications were in self-published zines titled things like We Have Lives, This City of Faces and Throat Flower.

She went to become a co-editor of Broken Pencil, the guide to zines and independent arts, and eventually to publish her own magazine, Kiss Machine. During Kiss Machine's eight-and-a-half year run, it also published an award-winning line of comics by Canadian women writers and artists.

Her first book was the life story of gender-bending science fiction author Judith Merril, Better to Have Loved (Between the Lines). Merril was Pohl-Weary’s grandmother, and she had started the book prior to her death. Pohl-Weary completed it posthumously in the same voice. It won a Hugo Award and was a finalist for the Toronto Book Award.

Selections from her critically acclaimed anthology of writing about female superheroes Girls Who Bite Back: Witches, Mutants, Slayers and Freaks (Sumach Press) was an opportunity for 34 writers to analyse and redefine the notion of powerful women. The year it launched, contributors toured 17 cities across North America, doing readings from the book and running superhero makeovers on the audience.

Her novel A Girl Like Sugar (McGilligan Books) is the coming-of-age tale of a girl who’s haunted by her dead rock star boyfriend. Her poetry collection, Iron-on Constellations (Tightrope Books), explores the illness, love and isolation hidden beneath busy urban life. Video artists and stop-motion animators have adapted several of the poems.

Pohl-Weary lives in Toronto with her husband, technology and media analyst Jesse Hirsh. She's currently working on a new novel, a film script, and is completing a Master’s Degree in Fine Arts at the University of British Columbia.